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Parameter tuning differentiates granule cell subtypes enriching the repertoire of retransmission properties at the cerebellum input stage

Authors: Stefano Masoli* 1, Marialuisa Tognolina* 1, Umberto Laforenza 2, Francesco Moccia 3, Egidio D'Angelo 1,4

Author information: 1 Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 6, I-27100, Pavia, Italy, 2 Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 6, I-27100, Pavia, Italy, 3 Department of Biology and Biotechnology, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 6, I-27100, Pavia, Italy, 4 Brain Connectivity Center, IRCCS Mondino Foundation, Via Mondino 2, I-27100, Pavia, Italy, * Co-Author,

Corresponding author: Egidio D'Angelo ( dangelo@unipv.it )

Journal: Biorxiv

Download Url: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/638247v1

Citation: Masoli S.*, Tognolina M.*, Laforenza U., Moccia F., D’Angelo E. Parameter tuning differentiates granule cell subtypes enriching the repertoire of retransmission properties at the cerebellum input stage. Biorxiv 2019.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1101/638247

Licence: the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license  applies for all files. Under this Open Access license anyone  may copy, distribute, or reuse the files as long as the authors and the original source are properly cited.

Published paper 2020: https://humanbrainproject.github.io/hbp-bsp-live-papers/2020/masoli_et_al_2020/masoli_et_al_2020.html

Abstract:
The cerebellar granule cells (GrCs) form an anatomically homogeneous neuronal population which, in its canonical description, discharges regularly without adaptation. We show here that GrCs in fact generate diverse response patterns to current injection and synaptic activation, ranging from adaptation to acceleration of firing. Adaptation was predicted by parameter optimization in detailed GrC computational models based on the available knowledge on GrC ionic channels. The models also predicted that acceleration required the involvement of additional mechanisms. We found that yet unrecognized TRPM4 currents in accelerating GrCs could specifically account for firing acceleration. Moreover, adapting GrCs were better in transmitting high-frequency mossy fiber (MF) bursts over a background discharge than accelerating GrCs. This implied that different electroresponsive patterns corresponded to specific synaptic properties reflecting different neurotransmitter release probability. The correspondence of pre- and post-synaptic properties generated effective MF-GrC transmission channels, which could enrich the processing of input spike patterns and enhance spatio-temporal recoding at the cerebellar input stage.
Resources

Data and models: Experimental data and models used in the paper are available at the links reported below, grouped into the following categories: